Research Findings Suggest that Pain and Osteoarthritis Not Significant Barriers to Physical Activity

Researchers often work to identify barriers to physical activity.  Some barriers that have been assumed include pain and knee osteoarthritis (OA).  Research by Dr. Daniel K. White and colleagues published in Arthritis & Rheumatism explored whether (more…)

Suffering from Wrist Pain? Louisville Orthopedic Surgeon Explains De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis or “Gamer’s Thumb”

Are you suffering from De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis? If you are experiencing pain on the inside of your wrist that causes you discomfort whenever you hold things or clench your fist, you might have De Quervain’s Tenosynovitis.

This condition, which is also sometimes called gamer’s thumb, affects the two (more…)

Shoulder Pain After Swimming? Louisville Orthopedic Explains Swimmer’s Shoulder

When it comes to swimming injuries, shoulder pain is one of the most common complaints.  “Swimmer’s Shoulder” a term coined by Kennedy and Hawkins (1974), describes the shoulder pain experienced by some swimmers following activity.

Often considered an overuse injury, the shoulder pain may occur in one shoulder or (more…)

What is Osteochondritis Dissecans? More info from Louisville Orthopedic Surgeon

When cartilage becomes disconnected from the bone, people may experience a condition called osteochondritis dissecans. This joint condition most typically happens in the knees but it can also affect other bodily joints like the elbows.

While more common in men, people of all ages may experience osteochondritis dissecans. Some people do not experience any symptoms when they have osteochondritis dissecans. The condition may even heal on its own.  Others suffer from considerable pain, especially if the cartilage gets torn off and stuck inside of a joint.

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Shoulder Injuries Including AC Joint Common Among Football Players

Injuries to the shoulder are common in collegiate football players. The most common area of the shoulder injuries is the acromioclavicular joint (A-C joint).

AC joint injury accounts for 41% of all shoulder injuries among college football players. Dr. Jason Dragoo and colleagues viewed injury data from the 2004-2005 and 2008 through 2009 National Collegiate Athletic Association Surveillance System and published their results in the American Academy of Sports Medicine journal in October of this year. They found several interesting findings. (more…)

NFL Football Injuries – Does Field Surface Make a Difference? From Louisville Sports Medicine

Researchers have explored whether there is an injury rate difference in NFL players depending on the surface they play on: grass versus Field Turf.  Dr. Hershman  and colleagues studied the injury rates in the NFL for the 2000 through 2009 seasons and found that Field Turf resulted in a higher incidence of sprains of the ACL and eversion type ankle sprains.  (more…)

Making the Connection Between Concussions and Depression – Louisville Sports Medicine

There is an association with increased risk of depression and the number of concussions NFL footballs have sustained. Dr. Zackery Kerr, et. al just recently reported in October 2012 on 1,044 retired NFL football players in the American Journal of Sports Medicine.

Dr. Kerr’s research team found that in retired NFL players with no history of experiencing concussions, the players had an incidence of depression of 3 percent.  In contrast, the players who had experienced more than 10 (more…)

Differences in Shoulder Dislocations Based on Age

 As recently reported by Murthi and Ramirez (2012) in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, about one out of five shoulder dislocations are experienced by individuals older than 60. While older people who suffer from a dislocated shoulder have a lower chance of experiencing a reoccurrence, compared to younger individuals, they have a greater chance of experiencing other injuries to the brachial plexus, axillary nerve and/or rotator cuff.  Multiple injuries in this population which include, for example, a dislocated shoulder and rotator cuff tear, are sometimes overlooked in older individuals.  For more info, see: http://www.jaaos.org/content/20/10/615.abstract